SNAG Lifetime Achievement Award 2010-The Process of Making It

by Cynthia Eid on March 25, 2010

The SNAG Lifetime Achievement Award is presented each year, a the annual conference.

The SNAG Lifetime Achievement Award is presented each year, at the annual conference.Jurors Bernard Bernstein, Lane Coulter and Mary Ann Scherr unanimously chose Cynthia Eid's vessel as the winning design in SNAG's design competition for the award. It is an Argentium Sterling Bowl 3" X 3" X 3, on a marble base. The anticlastic rim is engraved in commemoration of the honoree.This year's recipient is Lois Betteridge. Past honorees include Stanley Lechtzin, Heikki Seppa, and Mary Ann Scherr.

Process-Part I: Deep Drawing in a Hydraulic Press

  • Argentium Silver sheet ready for microfolding (corrugation) .3mm thick
  • Argentium Silver sheet ready for microfolding

  • microfolding
  • microfolding (corrugation) .3mm thick Argentium Sterling Silver

    • Argentium sterling silver sheet was microfolded (corrugated) in a microfold brake. After annealing, it was microfolded again, at an angle to the first direction. Repeated annealing and microfolding was necessary to achieve the depth of the texture.
    • The textured silver sheet was cut into a circle.
    • The disc will be formed by deep drawing in a hydraulic press

    6-inch circle to deep draw seamless rim, 6-inch microfolded silver for bowl, and 3-inch disc for seamless base/"foot"
    6-inch circle to deep draw seamless rim, 6-inch microfolded silver for bowl, and 3-inch disc for seamless base/

    The rim is formed from a seamless cylinder  made by deep drawing a disc of sterling sheet in the hydraulic press, and then cutting a “slice” of the resulting cylinder. This was then formed using Bonny Doon’s anticlastic forming tools in the hydraulic press. The rim and bowl were carefully matched and fitted together. Silver brazing these two parts together was tricky—getting the alignment right, and avoiding having the solder fill the texture were exacting procedures.

    The base was made in a similar manner to the rim.

    deep draw tools, with partially drawn silver

    deep draw tools, with partially drawn silver

    making the silver form taller and narrower.  the steel dies form the metal. the delrin rings create space for the vessel to form into.

    Deep drawing in the hydraulic press. This is a re-draw: making the silver form taller and narrower. the steel dies form the metal. the delrin rings create space for the vessel to form into.

    The 6-inch silver disc has been drawn, and is shown on the punch.  The 3" disc is drawn.  other parts are in various states.

    The 6-inch silver disc has been drawn, and is shown on the punch. The 3

    After the microfolded Argentium Silver has been deep drawn, it is malleted over a rounded, "bullet-shaped" punch or stake to make the bowl form.

    After the microfolded Argentium Silver has been deep drawn, it is malleted over a rounded,

    The hydraulic press part of the process is completed.  In the foreground, are the bowl, foot, and rim.  In the background they are stacked together.

    The hydraulic press part of the process is completed. In the foreground, are the bowl, foot, and rim. In the background they are stacked together.

    PROCESS – PART II: Anticlasting, Silver Soldering, and Finishing

    After trimming the edge, it is gently anticlasted, using a mallet and a sinusoidal stake.

    After trimming the edge, it is gently anticlasted, using a mallet and a sinusoidal stake.

    A different part of the sinusoidal stake is used with a cross-peen mallet to anticlast the foot.

    A different part of the sinusoidal stake is used with a cross-peen mallet to anticlast the foot.

    The rim is (conveniently!) just the right size to be formed with the delrin anticlastic former.  Sometimes it comes out just right, but I usually need to do a bit by hand with a mallet and anticlastic stake.

    The rim is (conveniently!) just the right size to be formed with Bonny Doon's delrin anticlastic former in a hydraulic press. Sometimes it comes out just right, but I usually need to do a bit by hand with a mallet and anticlastic stake to get it to fit the bowl. This photo shows the tools, partially set up to use---under pressure, the urethane pushes the silver against the delrin anticlastic former.

    The three forms are ready to fit  and silver solder together.

    The three forms are ready to fit and silver solder together.

    Binding wire holds the foot in place.  The silver around the foot is painted with "stop-off" to prevent the solder going where it is not wanted.

    Binding wire holds the foot in place. The silver around the foot is painted with "stop-off" to make sure the solder does not go where it is not wanted.

    The foot is protected by carborundum grain while the rim is soldered on from the inside.

    The foot was protected by carborundum grain while the rim was soldered on from the inside. Since the rim had been sanded smooth before soldering, the copper in the Argentium Sterling discolored, just like traditional sterling.

    After pickling the silver clean and white, the solder joints are cleaned up at my bench.

    After pickling the silver clean and white, the solder joints are cleaned up at my bench.

    I am very careful about keeping my studio and kitchen separate, with the exception of using my kitchen oven to harden the Argentium Sterling.

    I am very careful about keeping my studio and kitchen separate, with the exception of using my kitchen oven to harden the Argentium Sterling.

    The heat of the oven hardened the silver, but also discolored the Argentium Sterling where it had been abraded during the clean-up after soldering.

    The heat of the oven hardened the silver, but also discolored the Argentium Sterling where it had been abraded during the clean-up after soldering.

    The Argentium Silver is pickled clean again.

    The Argentium Silver is pickled clean again.

    A patina is applied, to emphasize the texture of the silver bowl.

    A patina is applied, to emphasize the texture of the silver bowl.

    { 5 comments… read them below or add one }

    Cynthia Eid April 19, 2012 at 3:45 pm

    Hmmm….Life is curious. Here I am, in 2012, making this year’s award, and checking my blog to remind myself what my process is!
    C Eid

    Stevie B. April 6, 2010 at 8:55 pm

    What an amazing and inspiring process post!

    Thank you!!!

    Jamie King March 30, 2010 at 8:12 pm

    Cynthia,
    Congratulations on the Lifetime Achievement Award. It is well deserved! Also, thanks for sharing the process with us for the bowl. It is a beautiful bowl, and process isn’t immediately evident for those of us who are inexperienced in drawing. Again, Congrats!
    Jamie

    Virginia Vivier March 30, 2010 at 8:12 pm

    Thank you for sharing this. What a gorgeous, timeless piece.

    lee marshall March 29, 2010 at 12:13 am

    I have always admired this piece. Even though I knew how you created it, your clear, concise information set cleared up a couple of questions.

    Thank you for making this available.

    Lee (the saw guy)

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